Adjustable Hem & Cuffs

Polyester Rain Proof


NylonAnd polyester are both synthetic fabrics, but nylon production is more expensive, which results in a higher price for the consumer. Nylon also tends to be more durable and weather-resistant, which is why it is more likely to be used in outdoor apparel or gear. Both fabrics are flame retardant, but nylon is stronger, while polyester is more heat-resistant.

Comparison chart

Nylon Polyester
Chemical Name Polyamide Polyethylene Naphthalate
Manufacture Created as a liquid, mechanically spun and dried into individual fibers. Spun into thread from chemical solution.
Uses
Wearability Low moisture absorbency Wrinkle resistant
Durability Exceptionally strong, abrasion resistant, resistant to damage from oil and many chemicals. Strong, resistant to stretching and shrinking, resistant to most chemicals, crisp and resilient wet or dry, abrasion resistant.
Flammability Melts then burns rapidly Melts and burns at same time
Environmental impact Most nylon made from unavoidable oil refinery byproducts Non-biodegradable, but can be recycled - possible to purchase 100% recycled polyester
Comfort Light-weight, warm, smooth, soft, quick drying. Quick drying, light-weight, smooth.
Styles Blouses, dresses, foundation garments, hosiery, lingerie, underwear, raincoats, ski apparel, windbreakers, swimwear, cycle wear. Every form of clothing
Appearance Lustrous, wide range of colors. Wide range of colors, slightly slick.
Allergic reactions Possible, more likely caused by finishing resins, fibers repel typical allergens.
Maintenance Easy to wash, mildew resistant. Easily washed, mildew resistant.
Cleaning Easy to wash, mildew-resistant. Can be dried on low heat cycle, but must be removed as soon as finished. Can be ironed. Cannot be dry-cleaned. Easy to wash, mildew-resistant. Can be dried on low heat cycle, but must be removed as soon as finished. Can be ironed. Can usually be dry-cleaned.
Materials Polyamide made from petroleum. Polymer production of coal, air, water, petroleum products.
UV Resistance Somewhat Very
First Made First U.S. Commercial Nylon Fiber Production - 1939, DuPont Company First U.S. Commercial Nylon Fiber Production – 1953, DuPont Company
Worldwide Production Around 3.9 million metric tons, 11% of synthetic fiber production Around 21 million metric tons, 58% of synthetic fiber production


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